Understanding micromanagement

Cynthia Sanchez, a senior technical project management at SUSE, explains how to spot micromanagement, why it’s problematic, and how to stop yourself become a micromanager.

This video was provided by SUSE, one of Ada Lovelace Day’s generous sponsors.

About SUSE

SUSE logoSUSE is a global leader in innovative, reliable and enterprise-grade open source solutions. We specialise in Enterprise Linux, Kubernetes Management, and Edge solutions, and collaborate with partners and communities to empower our customers to innovate everywhere – from the data centre, to the cloud, to the edge and beyond. SUSE puts the “open” back in open source, giving customers the agility to tackle innovation challenges today and the freedom to evolve their strategy and solutions tomorrow. Follow SUSE on Twitter or LinkedIn.

Join us for Ada Lovelace Day Live Online!

Don’t forget to join us for Ada Lovelace Day Live Online on Tuesday 11 October, 20:00 BST, where you’ll get to hear about everything from poo to energy to candle flames to maths to the science of the human voice from our illustrious speakers Prof Sophie Scott, Dr Priti Parikh, Fran Scott, Susan Okereke, Yasmin Ali and Aphra Le Levier-Bennett. Tickets are free so book now!

A round-up of our amazing STEM role models

Over the years we’ve written over 100 blog posts about women in STEM and their discoveries, inventions and achievements, as well as posting videos of dozens of talks and discussions by and with women in STEM on our YouTube channel. To save you searching, here is a handy compendium of our links:

On the blog

On YouTube

Please note that, whilst most of our videos are suitable for all ages, there are a couple where swear words have crept through as Ada Lovelace Day Live was an event for adults. Please review videos in full before showing them to children.

Ada Lovelace Day Live! 2020 cancelled due to COVID-19

I am sad to announce that I have, with the agreement of my Advisory Council, taken the difficult decision to cancel the Ada Lovelace Day Live! 2020 event at The IET on 13 October.

This was not an easy decision to take, but I believe that it is the most responsible one.

At this point in the COVID-19 pandemic it is impossible to plan ahead to October and say for sure that we will be able to travel freely – we may well find ourselves dipping in and out of lockdowns for months to come. Even if we aren’t in lockdown, it may be inadvisable for people to congregate in large groups until we have widespread vaccination. It is our duty to consider the safety and health not just of our audience but also our speakers and those who work at the venue, so we believe that cancellation is the right decision.

We will still find ways to celebrate Ada Lovelace Day online, and will be taking the next couple of months to look at what that celebration might look like. We will let you know what our plans are as soon as we have worked them out.

For now, our thoughts are with everyone who has been affected, and our gratitude goes to all the staff of the NHS and other frontline health workers around the world, and all the essential workers who are keeping society going whilst the rest of us stay at home. These are difficult times, but we will get through them by working together and supporting each other.

– Suw Charman-Anderson, Founder, Ada Lovelace Day

Support your female staff with our mentoring network

Women are the powerhouse of the economy.

Companies with more women in senior roles are measurably more profitable and more innovative than male-dominated businesses. Women-led businesses outperform, by up to three times, those companies led by men. They are more productive, make better decisions, and have more engaged, happier employees who stay in their jobs for longer.

Women are not just the powerhouse of the STEM economy, they create healthier, fairer and more successful companies.

Leaving in droves

Despite their superior performance, women are leaving STEM in droves. Over half of women in science, engineering and technology careers will leave their industry in mid-career, despite loving their jobs. Why? Because they can’t see a future.

Companies that don’t hire and promote sufficient female talent are not just leaving money on the table, they’re spending unnecessarily: Replacing a single employee costs £30,000, mostly money lost on getting the new recruit up to speed.

The female advantage

Companies that take equality seriously, that nurture and promote female talent, will be most successful in the 2020s and beyond. They will have a gender-balanced workforce, better gender pay gap data, higher profits, better products, and lower staff churn and lower recruitment costs. They will also have a happier workforce that is more productive and innovative. And in a world where publicly traded companies last only ten years on average, you need every bit of advantage you can get.

The Finding Ada Network

The Finding Ada Network, a new mentoring and knowledge sharing network for women in STEM, provides a best-in-class mentoring platform and supports women with exclusive content and private member’s forum.

Members benefit from a structured mentoring plan, with regular check-ins to keep them on track. They will also enjoy a mobile app, profiles, automatic matching, meeting scheduling, goal setting, task lists and more.

And exclusive content covering careers advice, personal growth, and professional development ensures that women have access to the information they need to improve their leadership and soft skills.

Make mentorship work for your business

Decades of evidence shows that mentoring is effective at increasing staff promotion and retention rates, as well as increasing job satisfaction and productivity. Both mentors and mentees are more likely to be promoted and to stay in their jobs. Indeed, mentorship provides a 5x higher rate of promotion for mentees, a 6x higher rate of promotion for mentors, and a 30% improvement in staff retention.

And with the Finding Ada Network, we can rapidly onboard groups large or small, getting your staff invited and on board in a matter of minutes. This means that if you want to dip your toe into mentoring, we can spin up a pilot and get you going fast! If you’re already convinced that mentoring is the way to go, then our program gives you more than any other mentorship network.

So if your business is based in the United Kingdom or New Zealand, and you want to provide mentoring for the women on your staff, get in touch with me here on LinkedIn or by email at suw@findingada.com.

If you’re a woman in STEM, or a small business who’d like to bring up to five women on to the network, you can sign up right now.

Win a copy of Ada Lovelace Cracks the Code!

Ada Lovelace Cracks The Code book cover

Our lovely friends at Rebel Girls have just released their Chapter Book series, which includes the fictionalised biography Ada Lovelace Cracks the Code! The book is beautifully illustrated by Marina Munn, is suitable for children ages 6+, and would make a wonderful Christmas gift! And we have five copies to give away.

For the chance to win, simply email us at admin@findingada.com, using the subject line “Ada Lovelace Cracks the Code”, with your answer to the following question:

For which machine did Lovelace write her Bernoulli Program?

The deadline for the competition is midnight on Wednesday 18 December 2019, so get your answers in quickly!

More from Rebel Girls:

Growing up in nineteenth century London, England, Ada is curious about absolutely everything. She is obsessed with machines and with creatures that fly. She even designs her own flying laboratory!

According to her mother, Ada is a bit too wild, so she encourages Ada to study math. At first Ada thinks: Bleh! Who can get excited about a subject without pictures? But she soon falls in love with it. One day she encounters a mysterious machine, and from that moment forward Ada imagines a future full of possibility—one that will eventually inspire the digital age nearly two hundred years later.

Ada Lovelace Cracks the Code is the story of a pioneer in the computer sciences, and a testament to women’s invaluable contributions to STEM throughout history.

Includes additional text on Ada Lovelace’s lasting legacy, as well as educational activities designed to teach simple coding and mathematical concepts.