In conversation with Chi Onwurah MP

In conversation with Chi Onwurah from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
Chi Onwurah MP talks to Suw Charman-Anderson about her realisation at aged 9 that she wanted to be an engineer, her 23 year career as an electrical engineer and some of the projects she worked on, her transition into politics, and her work as Shadow Minister for Science, Research and Digital. She also talks about why we need more women in STEM to move into politics, the value of her engineering experience in her current job, and the challenges she’s faced as a black woman in engineering and now a black woman in politics.
About Chi
Chi Onwurah is a British Member of Parliament representing Newcastle upon Tyne Central and the Shadow Minister for Industrial Strategy Science & Innovation. She has previously held the positions of Shadow Minister for Culture and the Digital Economy, Shadow Cabinet Office Minister leading on cyber security, social entrepreneurship, civil contingency, open government an...

 

 

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A splendid regiment of women: 20th century archaeologists and palaeontologists

By Newnham College, Cambridge

Originally published in the ebook A Passion for Science: Stories of Discovery and Invention.

by Rebecca Wragg Sykes, Victoria Herridge, Brenna Hassett and Suzanne Pilaar Birch

The familiar narrative of female scholars being sidelined by the establishment is well-entrenched, and deservedly so, given the ample examples available. But to tell heroic tales of the triumph of the lone female scholar misses a key point — networks and collaborations are vital to scientific success. It could also undermine the aggregate contribution of women, potentially allowing them to be dismissed as anomalies.

In this chapter we introduce four British women from the first half of the 20th century who worked in archaeology and palaeontology: Dorothy Garrod, Dorothea Bate, Gertrude Caton-Thompson and Kathleen Kenyon. Frequently presented as islands in an ocean of patriarchal academia, these and many other women were in fact more like a chain of sea mounts and, like th...

 

 

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Launching and Running an Advocacy Group

Panel discussion from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
Why create a women's equality advocacy group? What challenges do founders face? And what are their goals for their organisations? We also talked about using social media to grow communities, different financial models for community organising, fundraising, and the difference between grassroots advocacy and business-backed groups.

Featuring:

Suw Charman-Anderson, founder of Finding Ada.com
Vanessa Vallely OBE, founder of WeAreTechWomen
Elisabeth Holm, founder of Sisterhood of Native American Coders
April Moh, executive sponsor of SUSE’s Women in Tech Network

About our speakers
Suw Charman-Anderson
Suw Charman-Anderson is the founder of FindingAda.com which inspires and supports women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) with three major projects: Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of women’s achievements in STEM; the Finding Ada Conference, an online event covering car...

 

 

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Ellie Highwood Q&A: Never too young – The importance of challenging science stereotypes in primary school

Q&A with Ellie Highwood, after her presentation from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
Organisations have been trying to get more women into science for decades, yet numbers remain low, perhaps because gendered views about science start to fix at age 5-7 whilst most “women into STEM” initiatives focus on KS3+. The talk will discuss the evidence for needing to start younger, and discuss how to increase “science capital” for all at primary school level using experiences as a STEM ambassador in primary schools, building science capital from EYFS to Year 6.
About Ellie
As a female physicist I worked in climate science research for over 20 years, including being Head of Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading. I was also Dean for Diversity and Inclusion there for 4 years. Now self-employed as a coach and diversity and inclusion consultant. Throughout I have volunteered as “Professor Ellie” co-creating hands-on science experiences for EYFS to Year 6 that he...

 

 

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Ellie Highwood: Never too young – The importance of challenging science stereotypes in primary school

Ellie Highwood's presentation from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
Organisations have been trying to get more women into science for decades, yet numbers remain low, perhaps because gendered views about science start to fix at age 5-7 whilst most “women into STEM” initiatives focus on KS3+. The talk will discuss the evidence for needing to start younger, and discuss how to increase “science capital” for all at primary school level using experiences as a STEM ambassador in primary schools, building science capital from EYFS to Year 6.
About Ellie
As a female physicist I worked in climate science research for over 20 years, including being Head of Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading. I was also Dean for Diversity and Inclusion there for 4 years. Now self-employed as a coach and diversity and inclusion consultant. Throughout I have volunteered as “Professor Ellie” co-creating hands-on science experiences for EYFS to Year 6 that help increase science ca...

 

 

Only members of the Finding Ada Network can view this page. Please log in below if you are a member, or find out more about how to sign up.