Launching and Running an Advocacy Group

Panel discussion from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
Why create a women's equality advocacy group? What challenges do founders face? And what are their goals for their organisations? We also talked about using social media to grow communities, different financial models for community organising, fundraising, and the difference between grassroots advocacy and business-backed groups.

Featuring:

Suw Charman-Anderson, founder of Finding Ada.com
Vanessa Vallely OBE, founder of WeAreTechWomen
Elisabeth Holm, founder of Sisterhood of Native American Coders
April Moh, executive sponsor of SUSE’s Women in Tech Network

About our speakers
Suw Charman-Anderson
Suw Charman-Anderson is the founder of FindingAda.com which inspires and supports women in science, technology, engineering and maths (STEM) with three major projects: Ada Lovelace Day, an international celebration of women’s achievements in STEM; the Finding Ada Conference, an online event covering car...

 

 

Only members of the Finding Ada Network can view this page. Please log in below if you are a member, or find out more about how to sign up.

Ellie Highwood Q&A: Never too young – The importance of challenging science stereotypes in primary school

Q&A with Ellie Highwood, after her presentation from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
Organisations have been trying to get more women into science for decades, yet numbers remain low, perhaps because gendered views about science start to fix at age 5-7 whilst most “women into STEM” initiatives focus on KS3+. The talk will discuss the evidence for needing to start younger, and discuss how to increase “science capital” for all at primary school level using experiences as a STEM ambassador in primary schools, building science capital from EYFS to Year 6.
About Ellie
As a female physicist I worked in climate science research for over 20 years, including being Head of Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading. I was also Dean for Diversity and Inclusion there for 4 years. Now self-employed as a coach and diversity and inclusion consultant. Throughout I have volunteered as “Professor Ellie” co-creating hands-on science experiences for EYFS to Year 6 that he...

 

 

Only members of the Finding Ada Network can view this page. Please log in below if you are a member, or find out more about how to sign up.

Ellie Highwood: Never too young – The importance of challenging science stereotypes in primary school

Ellie Highwood's presentation from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
Organisations have been trying to get more women into science for decades, yet numbers remain low, perhaps because gendered views about science start to fix at age 5-7 whilst most “women into STEM” initiatives focus on KS3+. The talk will discuss the evidence for needing to start younger, and discuss how to increase “science capital” for all at primary school level using experiences as a STEM ambassador in primary schools, building science capital from EYFS to Year 6.
About Ellie
As a female physicist I worked in climate science research for over 20 years, including being Head of Department of Meteorology at the University of Reading. I was also Dean for Diversity and Inclusion there for 4 years. Now self-employed as a coach and diversity and inclusion consultant. Throughout I have volunteered as “Professor Ellie” co-creating hands-on science experiences for EYFS to Year 6 that help increase science ca...

 

 

Only members of the Finding Ada Network can view this page. Please log in below if you are a member, or find out more about how to sign up.

Cecilia Payne-Gaposchkin: What is the Universe made of?

Originally published in the ebook A Passion for Science: Stories of Discovery and Invention.

by Alice Sheppard

Cecilia Helena Payne was a hugely successful astronomer who discovered the composition of stars when she was 25. She is well known in astronomical circles, but few others know her name despite the significance of her discovery. She was, as fellow astronomer Dorrit Hoffleit remembered many years after her death, “the most brilliant and at the same time the person most discriminated-against at Harvard College Observatory”.

A note on names: Payne is remembered by many names. She is often referred to by her first name or, after she married, as Mrs G. These days, she would be Dr or Professor Payne-Gaposchkin, which seems more appropriate given her achievements. In this account, as we watch her age and status change, Cecilia, Payne, Payne-Gaposchkin or Mrs G will all refer to her.
A bright streak of inspiration
Cecilia Payne was born in 1900 to upper-class but close and l...

 

 

Only members of the Finding Ada Network can view this page. Please log in below if you are a member, or find out more about how to sign up.

In conversation with Caroline Walker of J.P. Morgan

In conversation with Caroline Walker from the Finding Ada Conference 2020.
Synopsis
In this conversation, Caroline Walker talked about her career journey, what diversity and inclusion means to her, using data to support D&I initiatives and how to stop them becoming a box-ticking exercise, eliminating bias in hiring and promotion processes, advice for people just starting to implement D&I programs in their companies, and much, much more.
About Caroline
Caroline Walker is managing director and EMEA head of diversity and inclusion at J.P. Morgan. She graduated in 2001 with an MA (Hons) Psychology from Edinburgh University. She worked on a research project with the Ministry of Defence developing and rolling out a model for the early identification of Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder which was later adopted by other blue light services. She then joined IT consultancy Sapient in the city in 2003 as an HR professional.

In 2006, Caroline moved to J.P.Morgan.  Over the last 10 ...

 

 

Only members of the Finding Ada Network can view this page. Please log in below if you are a member, or find out more about how to sign up.